Chrysler 26
Last updated: January 19, 2016
Copyright © 2000-2016 All rights reserved
Avocet
A 1979 Chrysler 26 Sailboat
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Page Index
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Introduction
History
Designer
Characteristics
Racing/Speed
Keel and Hull
Rudder/Tiller
Sail and Rigging
Double Mainsheet
Rigging Notes
Accommodations
Trailer
Wiring
Winterizing
Not on Our Boat
Checklist
Inventory
Links
Contact
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Ship's Log
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2000 | 2001 | 2002
2003 | 2004 | 2005
2006 | 2007 | 2008
2009 | 2010 | 2011
2012 | 2013 | 2014
2015 | 2016 | 
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Avocet a Chrysler 26

INTRODUCTION

This is the continuing story of Avocet, a 1979 Chrysler 26 sailboat we purchased in August 2000. Gregg & Margaret are the third owners of Avocet and we sail out of the Regina Beach Yacht Club. The Regina Beach Yacht Club is located on the shores of Last Mountain Lake in the town of Regina Beach, about 65 kilometres (40 miles) northwest of Regina, Saskatchewan. Incorporated in 1913 the Regina Beach Yacht Club (RBYC) is one of the oldest Yacht Clubs between Toronto, Ontario and Vancouver, British Columbia. Last Mountain Lake, or Long Lake as is it known locally, provides approximately 75 kilometres (45 miles) of boating and fishing pleasure.

Saskatchewan is undeniably a landlocked province, separated from the nearest coastline by hundreds of kilometres. But surprisingly, it still has a rich heritage of sailing, stretching back well over 200 years. Saskatchewan's sailing history has been written up in a book by Terry Pugh called "Prevailing Westerlies - A History of Sailing in Saskatchewan" published by the Saskatchewan Sailing Clubs Association, 1999.

The story of Avocet started out originally as an edited collection of e-mails with the previous owner Al McMillan and has evolved into what you see here. At one time I read "If you are lucky, you have a feeling of stewardship for your boat. She is a living thing that has been entrusted to your care, and if you care for her, she will care for you." It is in that spirit this material is written.


"There is nothing-absolutely nothing-half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. In or out of 'em, it doesn't matter. Nothing seems really to matter, that's the charm of it. Whether you get away, or whether you don't; whether you arrive at your destination or whether you reach somewhere else, or whether you never get anywhere at all, you're always busy, and you never do anything in particular; and when you've done it there's always something else to do, and you can do it if you like, but you'd much better not." The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), British essayist and writer. 

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