Chrysler 26
Last updated: January 7, 2018
Copyright © 2000-2018 All rights reserved
Avocet
A 1979 Chrysler 26 Sailboat
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Introduction
History
Designer
Characteristics
Racing/Speed
Keel and Hull
Rudder/Tiller
Sail and Rigging
Double Mainsheet
Rigging Notes
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Trailer
Wiring
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Not on Our Boat
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Ship's Log
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2000 | 2001 | 2002
2003 | 2004 | 2005
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2015 | 2016 | 2017
2018 | 
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RACING/SPEED

Skean-dhu heeling over

We don't race although we like to test our skills against other sailboats non-competitively. The second owner was in a few races but the ones he liked were the pursuit kind or the ones that take you to a destination rather than around the buoys. He won a couple of seven mile races against seventeen other boats on corrected time.

Three sailing photos of Skean-dhu

PHRF rating is 228. PHRF ratings are expressed in seconds per mile to be deducted from elapsed time to produce corrected times. The higher the PFRA rating the slower boat is. The Tanzer 26 has a PHRF rating of 228. Generally, the larger the boat, the faster it can go. The maximum speed a given hull can attain from wind power is called "hull speed" and is largely dependent on the waterline length of the boat.

There is a way that a displacement boat can exceed its theoretical hull speed, and that is by surfing. Surfing is being pushed by a wave just the way surfer ride a wave on a surfboard. In large wave conditions, when running downwind, a sailboat can get on the front side of a wave and carry it for quite a number of seconds with a tremendous burst of speed. It takes a good helmsmanship to be able to get on the wave just right to reap the greatest benefits from it. Though light planing boats tend to surf more easily, displacement boats are perfectly capable of surfing and can far exceed their hull speed in this manner. Two articles on this topic can be found at: Hull Speed Demystified, and Maximum Hull Speed.

The second owner regularly hit 6.5 knots, over 8 occasionly in a big blow, and the rare wild surfing ride over 9+. The GPS was in agreement with the knotmeter. Certainly the Chrysler likes wind. The weight of the boat makes for good momentum in the lulls when lighter boats stall a bit." Rik Sneeuwjagt, the owner of a similar Chrysler 26 and previous web master of the Chrysler Sailing Association Web Site also confirmed exceeding the theoretical hull speed. According to Rik, it isn't all that unusual to do with the right weather conditions and proper sail trim. These statements have been proven by our own experience.

"For the truth is that I already know as much about my fate as I need to know. The day will come when I will die. So the only matter of consequence before me is what I will do with my allotted time. I can remain on shore, paralyzed with fear, or I can raise my sails and dip and soar in the breeze." Richard Bode, First you have to row a little boat