Chrysler 26
Last updated: January 7, 2018
Copyright © 2000-2018 All rights reserved
Avocet
A 1979 Chrysler 26 Sailboat
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Page Index
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Introduction
History
Designer
Characteristics
Racing/Speed
Keel and Hull
Rudder/Tiller
Sail and Rigging
Double Mainsheet
Rigging Notes
Accommodations
Trailer
Wiring
Winterizing
Not on Our Boat
Checklist
Inventory
Links
Contact
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Ship's Log
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2000 | 2001 | 2002
2003 | 2004 | 2005
2006 | 2007 | 2008
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2012 | 2013 | 2014
2015 | 2016 | 2017
2018 | 
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RUDDER AND TILLER ASSEMBLY

Rudder Shape

The rudder image provides a general representation of the size and shape of the Chrysler 26 rudder. The face view of the rudder is reasonably accurate, but the leading and trailing edges are approximate representations.

Rudder Craft has made a numer of products for the Chrysler 26 including rudder blades, rudder bearings, tillers and more.

At one time Edson International, Marine Division made wheel conversions for the Chrysler 26.

The May/June 1999 issue of Good Old Boat, pages 13-19, featured an article called "Tillers, What's old is the latest thing", by Lin Pardey and provided a pros and cons chart that showed the advantages of a tiller.

The July/August 1999 issue of Good Old Boat, pages 6-7, featured a follow-up letter to the editor by William Keene, President of the Edson Corporation in support of wheeled steering.

A write up on How to Repair Your Rudder Thru-Hull Assembly can be found in the "How-To" section of the Chrysler Sailing Association Website. Bob Gumpright shared his experiences in repairing/replacing the rudder thru-hull assembly on his 1978 C-22 "Ryan's Way". While the write up and photos demonstrate the process for a C-22, owners of the other Chrysler cruising boats (C-20 and C-26) with a similar rudder configuration may be able to use this process as well. For more information about how to repair the rudder and rudder post assembly, check out the "How-To" tutorial How to Repair Your Rudder Assembly written by Raleigh Martin.

Apparently the entire assembly requires 50 inches of clearance under the stern to remove. Shown are the upper end of the assembly (including clamp, spacer and rudder cap bearing) and the lower end (including rudder cup bearing and spacer.

The May/June 2001 issue of Good Old Boat, pages 38-39, featured an article "Rudder Tubes, A little routine inspection can help prevent that sinking feeling", by Bill Sandifer.